CoolSculpting: Frequently Asked Questions

  • By Healthy Living Liberty Lake
  • 07 Oct, 2016

Everything you need to know about CoolSculpting!

QUESTION: Am I a good candidate?
ANSWER: Good candidates have noticeable bulges in certain areas they’d like to get rid of. The CoolSculpting fat reduction procedure is specifically designed for those who have unwanted fat that resists diet and exercise. Unlike gastric bypass surgery, the CoolSculpting procedure is not a weight loss solution for people who are obese. It is, however a non-surgical alternative to liposuction. Request a one-on-one consultation with us to determine if the CoolSculpting procedure is right for you.

QUESTION: How much does the CoolSculpting procedure cost?
ANSWER: The price for CoolSculpting procedures varies depending on your areas of concern, the number of sessions needed, and your ultimate goals. We will help create a customized treatment plan, in person, that’s tailored to your body, your goals, and your budget.

QUESTION: How long is each session? How many sessions will I need?
ANSWER: We will help you create an individualized treatment plan tailored to your specific goals. The length of your CoolSculpting session will vary depending on the number of areas being treated during one visit. We may schedule additional sessions in order to meet your goals.

QUESTION: Where does the fat go? Are the results permanent?
ANSWER: Once the treated fat cells are crystallized (frozen), your body processes the fat and eliminates these dead cells. Once the treated fat cells are gone, they’re gone for good.

QUESTION: What does it feel like?
ANSWER: As the cooling begins during the first few minutes, you will feel pressure and intense cold. This soon dissipates. Many people read, watch videos, work on their laptop, or even take a nap during their treatment.

QUESTION: Is the CoolSculpting procedure safe?
ANSWER: The CoolSculpting procedure is FDA-cleared for the flank (love handles), abdomen, and thigh. With over one million CoolSculpting treatments performed worldwide, it is proven to be a safe and effective treatment for non-surgical fat reduction.

QUESTION: Are there any side effects?
ANSWER: During the procedure you may experience deep pulling, tugging, pinching, numbness or discomfort. Following the procedure, typical side effects include temporary numbness, redness, swelling, bruising, firmness, tingling, stinging and pain. Rare side effects may also occur. The CoolSculpting procedure is not for everyone. You should not have the CoolSculpting procedure if you suffer from cryoglobulinemia or paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. The CoolSculpting procedure is not a treatment for obesity. As with any medical procedure, ask us if the CoolSculpting procedure is right for you.

QUESTION: Can I return to normal activities after my treatment?
ANSWER: Yes, you can. The CoolSculpting procedure is completely non-surgical, so typically you can return to normal activities immediately. Often times, patients return to work after their CoolSculpting session is over.

QUESTION: When will I see results?
ANSWER: You may start to see changes as quickly as three weeks after your treatment, and will experience the most dramatic results after two months. But your body will still flush out fat cells and continues doing so for up to four to six months after treatment.

QUESTION: Do I need to take special supplements or follow a strict diet and exercise program?
ANSWER: No supplements or pills are required and you do not have to adopt new diet and exercise habits. Many patients feel more motivated to take care of themselves after their CoolSculpting treatment. It is as if they get a second lease on their body and want to start anew again by taking even better care of themselves.

QUESTION: What happens if I gain weight down the road?
ANSWER: Many people, after seeing the results from their CoolSculpting procedure, take even better care of themselves. However, if you do gain weight, you may gain it evenly all over your body, not just in the treated areas.1

1. Data on file. ZELTIQ Aesthetics, Inc.

By Healthy Living Liberty Lake 12 Oct, 2017
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer occurring in men. Approximately 230,000 men a year are diagnosed with the disease, while 29,000 of them will die from it - a 90% survival rate. We don't know if the 29,000 who die have died from the actual treatment of the disease, versus the cancer itself. The risk of prostate cancer increases with age, and most cases are diagnosed after age 65. It is rare under age 40.

There is much controversy regarding prostate cancer treatment. Most cases are indolent, meaning they don't spread outside of the prostate itself and that the patient will die from something else before prostate cancer becomes a mortal threat. Men with low risk prostate cancer need no treatment and are good candidates for active surveillance.  

If your PSA is between 1.5-4, you have a 15 times greater risk of prostate cancer than men with a PSA < 1.5. So if you're told that your PSA is high, or on exam you have a nodule that is suspicious, the only option that has been offered until now was a 3D color doppler or MRI, and prostate biopsy. However, there is concern that a biopsy may contribute to spread of the disease past the capsule of the prostate, and that if left alone it would have stayed encapsulated, causing no health issues. 80% of men who undergo biopsy, which is a painful and bloody procedure, have either no cancer or an indolent form of cancer.

This may explain why there have been studies showing that those who did nothing with a diagnosis of prostate cancer have the same survival as those who were treated.

What should you do if told you either have, or may have, prostate cancer?

Get a test called a 4K score (4Kscore.com). This is a specialized blood test that is sent to the 4K lab, and can help to differentiate if the tumor you have is one that is likely to be more indolent, or one that is more likely to be aggressive and requires treatment. If it comes back low risk, then you can talk to your doctor about active surveillance. Meaning, just watch it for now. And avoid the pain and possible risks of prostate biopsy.

The test is covered by insurances and Medicare, and is simple to do.

You can reduce your risk of ever developing prostate cancer, and also reduce the size of the prostate with a few simple measures:
    1) Take vitamin D, and have your levels checked -- it should be between 70-90. A low vitamin D is strongly associated with prostate cancer.  
    2) Have your testosterone and estrogen levels checked. A low testosterone is associated with prostate cancer, as is a high estrogen level. If your testosterone is low, get your levels up using bio-identical testosterone, and if the estrogens are high, you'll need to lower your levels. I often use a drug called anastrazole to lower estrogen in men.
    3) Use a supplement to reduce the size of the prostate and to reduce PSA. I like one by Xymogen, called Prostate Flo.
It's an excellent product for the prostate, a combination of zinc, saw palmetto, pygeum, cranberry fruit, B6, and beta-sitosterol. Zinc is highly concentrated in the prostate and a lack of zinc has been associated with a reduction in the repair of DNA damage in prostate tissue. Zinc is also necessary for the production of testosterone.

For a much more comprehensive review of alternative views in the treatment of prostate cancer, go to SurvivingProstateCancer.org.

By Dr. Susan Ashley, M.D.
By Healthy Living Liberty Lake 05 Oct, 2017
For anti-aging, nothing replaces activity and movement, and now another study out of Britain emphasizes this point. Men who played sports in mid-life were more likely to be active in old age than those who did other types of physical activity in mid-life. This was especially true for those who played sports for many years, the findings showed. For those that played sports for 25 years, they were nearly five times more likely to be physically active in old age than those who didn't play sports.

The research included 3500 men, ages 40-59, and followed them for 20 years.  Those who were physically active in mid-life were nearly three times more likely to be active at the end of the study period.

Men tended to take up walking as they aged. At the start of the study, just 27% reported high levels of walking. By the end of the study, that number was 62%.

It was felt that people's enjoyment of sport may be more likely to persist into old age than preferences for other types of activity. Sport participation in mid-life may help maintain physical function and physical activity in later life, increasing psychological and physical readiness in old age.

The bottom line?  Start being active early in life. Allow your children to play sports, run, jump, bike, and get in the habit of moving and exercising while playing. This habit will be more likely to follow them into mid-life, and then into later life.  
Your muscles and bone density will stay stronger, and the quality of life will drastically improve.  

When you walk, try to walk briskly, at a pace of 3-4 miles per hour. Many studies have shown that the faster the pace, the longer the life. And when the pace slows down, aging is accelerating.

Ligament, tendon and muscle injuries are more likely to occur as we age. To counter this, I keep a supplement made by Standard Process called Ligaplex at home. It works great for these injuries, to allow healing much more quickly. Stem cells of course also allow for a much faster healing rate for orthopedic injuries.

Our bodies are meant for motion - don't let yourself slow down when you reach your 40s and 50s and beyond!

By Dr. Susan Ashley, M.D.
By Healthy Living Liberty Lake 28 Sep, 2017
One in three seniors will die of dementia. One in three!! If you think one-third of all seniors will die with dementia isn't shocking enough, below are some more terrifying facts about what happens to our minds as we get older:

  • One in eight over 65 years old in the USA has Alzheimer’s
  • In 2014, an estimated 5.2 million in the USA have Alzheimer’s
  • Women are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s than men
  • One in six Women will develop Alzheimer’s
  • Just five years ago in 2012 the United States alone spent $200 billion with Medicare, Medicaid and Out of Pocket Expense for Alzheimer’s and other Dementia care not including Private Health Insurance. This number is projected to go to $1 trillion.
  • Alzheimer’s can start as early as the 30s, 40s, and 50s.
Remember this if you still can, as the population starts to age we have to be ready for what is rapidly going to be one of our biggest healthcare problems, if not THE biggest healthcare problem, dementia in all its forms. We now know that one-third of our aging population will die with a form of dementia and one-sixth of all women will die with the most common form -- Alzheimer's. This epidemic can become an unimaginable burden on the family and loved ones that take care of the afflicted.  

Dementia will soon become the biggest cost of the healthcare system. This is a larger problem than AIDs in the 1980s, and just as serious as cancer and heart disease. As over 10,000 people a day, projected to go to 15,000 people a day, turn 65 in the USA, dementia will soon be the number one health risk.
  
There are many types of dementia, with Alzheimer's being the most common. Two other forms of dementia are multi-infarct - or small strokes - and Parkinson's disease. It is basically any condition that develops when nerve cells in the brain die or no longer function normally. The death of the nerve cells causes changes in memory, behavior, and ability to think clearly. In Alzheimer's, the brain changes eventually impair an individual's ability to carry out such basic bodily functions as walking and swallowing, and is ultimately fatal.

So what are we to do?  In our clinic if any of our patients are complaining of their memory, or "senior moments", we obtain the most sensitive indicator of brain functioning, a QEEG, or quantitative EEG. Covered by Medicare and most insurances, this will tell us how the brain is working in every lobe, and what can be done to improve brain functioning. I use a number of specific brain supplements to nourish the brain, including omega 3s and the B vitamins, depending on what the QEEG shows. Neurofeedback can be used to help brain functioning, and exercise performed regularly is known to improve our brains. Diabetes should be well controlled, since high blood sugars are devastating to the brain cells and create more inflammation. And recently we've started Stem Cell therapy to help slow Alzheimer's or dementia from any cause.

If you want to read more, buy the book The End of Alzheimers by Dale Bredesen, M.D. It's a wonderful book that is highly informative and should be a must-read by everyone over the age of 50.  

By Dr. Susan Ashley, M.D.
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